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Shane

some tips to make your hoof trimming easier

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Here are some tips to make your hoof trimming easier.

 

If your horse's leg gets a bit heavy you may want to look at getting a hoof jack. Or if you already have a hoof stand, you may want to get some clever person to make an attachment to help hold your horse's leg up. Here is a link to read more about the hoof jack. http://www.horseshoes.com/supplies/alphabe...ineinnovations/

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If your horse's feet are really hard, then Meredith recommends you get yourself a cordless Dremel. Meredith uses hers daily and can't imagine how she did without it!

dremel.jpg

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I love my Dremel;

 

Best investment as it is just too tiring to do it without, especially with the steel hard hooves in the drought.

 

Bit of practice will do. I found I was not that coordinated and strong with the knife on the left and I now kind of use the knife in the right hand and the Dremel for the left.

 

Peter also showed us a fantastic short cut - Show your horse the stand or stool and ask permission. Also crawl under the horse (asking first) so that the horse will accept you in his space. He uses a milk crate to sit on and he shows it to the horse and then tells it foot back and swings the crate from front to past the shoulder and then puts it down, lifts the leg and then sits down on the crate to work in the underside of the hoof.

 

Same with the front, he uses an old centre part of a washing machine as a foot stand. Shows it to the horse, puts it down and then lifts the foot onto the stand.

 

This works wonderfully well. I will try to get a video clip of it up onto the website.

 

Cheers

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i'd love to see peter's short cut on video.

 

my husband made me a hoof stand out of bits of things we had lying around. sure makes life easier especially in the early days of learning to trim, when it takes longer. just need a horse that is prepared to stand still that long :-)

 

maree

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Ok never heard of a dremel before where do you buy such a thing hehe!!

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Hi Anrose, I brought my dremel from Bunnings and I think I paid about $128.00 for it. It came in a nice little case with lots of attachments. I love it. I am still learning to trim my horses hooves, but we are slowly getting there. :D

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Are there any vidoes of someone using a Dremel?? What kind of disc do you use? I've found some on Ebay that are only $50 but have no disc with them.

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Hi Nay_Nay

 

thank you for reviving this post. I was chatting with hubby yesterday about getting a Dremel and I was wondering about what disc I should use for hoof trimming.

 

Firefly realy needs weekly trimming and I think a Dremel would make my life so much easier as her feet are rock hard.

 

Thanks :)

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Hi Renee.

 

Just a few pointers regarding using a Dremel. Firstly I don't have or use one (just haven't got around to buying one). You need to know the desired shape of the hoof more so than when using a hoof knife. The design of the hoof knife dictates the shape we trim, we don't have the same luxury with a Dremel. Also, Meredith advised me that you need to move quite fast (as in not leave the dremel in the one spot for too long as it will heat up too much and may burn the inner hoof "bits".)

 

It's definitely easier by what I've heard, and I can't even touch the horses soles with my knife at the moment, they are so hard. Need some rain to soften things up a bit.

 

Check YouTube if there aren't any links on the forum.

 

Cheers for now.

Luv

Ann

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Oh BTW, checked on YouTube for any footage of people trimming their horses hooves with a Dremel, nothing there. There are videos of people trimming their horses hooves with an angle grinder. :blink: but I think I'll leave that one to the experts.

 

Bye for now.

Ann

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perhaps we could have a demo video of Meredith trimming with the dremmel? I only do two feet at a time, don't know how the trimer goes on to do another 20 horses!!

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i have trimmed my horses feet with an angle grinder. did lots of practice on soft wood to get the hang of it & desensitization with the horses before i tackled their feet.

 

it's not as difficult or dangerous as you would think. as with a lot of things we do with our horses, preparation is the key.

 

one of my horses took to it like a duck to water (once he stopped snorting at the power lead <_<), but lightning, who has rock hard feet & is the reason i attempted it in the first place, still isn't convinced. so i still have to do his feet the hard way if i don't ride, but they usually just need a bit of a re-shape rather than a trim.

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G’day All!!!

 

OK I have quietly watched this thread for quite while and bitten my tongue, or more accurately, my typing fingers…

 

I do not believe that power tools are the answer…

 

“Dremel tools” are gutless and you will never have the horsepower you need to trim a hoof properly.

 

Angle grinders can be either gutless or very powerful, and anyone who has the strength to control the powerful ones does not need them to trim a hoof.

 

I own two “Dremel” equivalents…

 

One is a European “Proxxon” that has much more power than a USA Dremel. The other is an Italian PG mini which is as fast and costs half as much as a “Dremel”.

 

I use them to sharpen and customise hoof knives and cheap nippers…

 

I use them on dead specimen hoofs, and sections of hoofs, to prepare them for photography...

 

I have never used them on a live hoof and I do not think I would ever want to do so.

 

I have used “angle grinders” on hoofs and have taught people how to use angle grinders on hoofs…

 

The low powered ones the “The Girls” may want to use are gutless and harder to use than normal hand tools.

 

The high powered ones are great but require more strength and skill than most blokes have.. OK I can do it but I don’t like it!!!

If you can’t cut things with a knife or rasp, you should have a good quality nipper and perhaps even a “half round” nipper as well.

 

Throw away any knife that is made of stainless steel or that you cannot really sharpen. If it wont rust neither will it get sharp or stay sharp… ( and all of those lovely “F. Dick” knives with the lovely rosewood handles are great if you never want to cut a hard piece of hoof.)

 

OK so good quality costs a bit more… My “GE” nippers cost about $300.00 but they last for a long time.

 

I love the $90.00 “Double S” Italian knives or the $120.00 “Paul Mitchell” Australian knives… They cut!!!

 

But so do the $20.00 Japanese “Soyo” or Mustad high carbon steel knives.

 

Electric gadgets that you do not use, or that do not work, cost a lot too but that money is wasted and they often join the junk sitting, unused, in the shed or tack room.

 

Get good tools and good training in tool skills or get a professional to help to do the hard work, or to teach you how to use the tools correctly.

 

I am not a big tough bloke… I am fat, old, weak and past my prime… my apprentice is a woosey, shy, 17yo girl who I keep telling that she needs to go to the gym and build up her arm muscles… Today we trimmed nine horse who all had dry, hard hoofs; not a “Dremel’ or angle grinder in sight… and we still had time to play and we went home at 2.00pm…

 

It is not about the hardness or horsepower it is about learning how to do it correctly!

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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cheers Peter! I must not be doing it correctly then.........but I'm not using a full size rasp just a wee diddy one, maybe that would make a difference.... but I am too scared of taking too much off so probably spend twice a long taking off half as much.

my trimmer comes every six weeks and checks what I have done, then he does his trim and comments on whats to be done, answers all my questions I have written down.... all is well so far, but thinking of it he has never actually watched me trim....

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Hi All,

I have found that with the benefit of attending some barefoot trimming clinics and regular practice it has become easier to do. To begin with I found it an exhausting task but it does get easier as your skill improves. I certainly am still learning but I am getting better and more confident as I go along. I am still learning how to identifying flares and reduce these properly, but I am getting better. I do find if I do regular trims there is less of a need to use the clippers. My challenge is learning the skill to sharpen the knives etc. Having blunt tools makes the job so much harder. Thanks for the tip on tools Peter, I think I might invest in some good tools, knowing how it makes the job so much easier.

 

Vicki

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Hi Everyone,

I come from a very dry environment and find that my horses hooves get extremely hard and I have always soaked them in soak boots for a couple of hours before hand. I have found that it makes them much easier to trim. The boots that I use I have had for a number of years and are extremely tough - and I have used them lots! so I think that they are well worth investing in if you don't have much rain or even overnight dew to keep your horses feet that little bit softer for trimming.

 

Of course, having sharp gear does help - I have been using the same rasp for probably 8 years. I knew that it was getting a bit blunt but didn't realize how blunt it was until I bought a new one the other day :whistling:

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LOL, I know what you mean Mel, I cut my fingers on a new rasp because I used it with the same ooph as my old blunt one :whistling:

 

We were just talking feet, before I saw this post and Marty has a dremel for me :clapping: might practise on some wood first :huh:

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Try your toe nails maybe Tracey :thumbsup:

I have found it is a good idea to tie the tail up if using power tools :eek::horse::oops:

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Thanks for the tip :eek: was thinking about how to get them used to it first, didn't even think about the tail...

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Me thinks I'll stick to sharp tools.

 

'cole

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Guest Deborah Dodds

I found this site by looking for you tube hoof shaping with dremel. Can't find any actual video, but I use a Cummins low powered grinder now and want to use the dremel to round into the mustang roll easier and get into the smaller areas. Power tools are the only way I can trim my horses, and I wish I had heard about them years ago. Go to Soft Touch hoof trimming. Excellent site and they even sell the Cummins trimmers in a little kit, and there's a video also. Don't be afraid - I'm 60 and weigh in at about 145 pounds, so I'm not strong. My horses did not spook, just run it up around them, start by standing say 10 feet away, then get closer - rub them with it (off of course) then pull back and turn it on. They will be okay, if they are okay with normal handling.

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Hi , the  trimming video is not there anymore , I've just got.some.nippers , knife and a rasp.and want to.find instructions.before I let myself.loose on my pony . Is there another link to it ? Many thanks 

Edited by tilda8

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Have a look at the 10 minute trim video in the Trek’n Train videos.

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