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Hi Trace :-)

 

I use "Harpers" brand Borax, used to be able to get in Woolies but they've switched to "no name " one. Can still get from IGA at Boronia Heights (in laundry aisle). Have emailed Harpers couple of times & assured me just "Borax" (11% Boron & no alluminium)& sent me *ysis if u want a copy. It's the brand they use on "human folk remedy " sites too. Take 1/16 tsp a day myself now & still kicking :thumbsup:. Sarry's 29 now & chiro says still no sign arthritus :D

 

Kaz

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gee Tracey, they are coming along. I just found this one, I was wondering how she was doing.

 

'cole

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Hi Nicole,

Thanks for your interest. So far so good. Like the rest of the East coast of Australia we've been pretty damp for a few weeks. I'm usually very excited to see green grass... even the 'sacrafice' paddock were she is kept all of the time, has green shoots coming up. I keep all the horses in that paddock of a night time hoping they will beat her to he green stuff, before letting them out next morning. I am worried sick each day that I will come home to a 'sick' pony. I have a smaller yard that is only 6m x 7m but I can't leave her stand in there all the time either, she needs to move around. and well the mud... it's every where. I kept her in the shed for a week but it just kept raining, again no good for her to be in there either. I do have some road based areas, where the ponies go from time to time but I can't afford to road base a whole paddock. So I guess I'm doing the best with what I've got, and hope this will be best that it can be, for her. She is due for another trim on Thursday, if it's not to wet and muddy I'll try to update the photos too.

 

Cheers Trace

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Hi Tracey,

 

have you considered a 'paddock paradise' set up so your pony can keep moving, but still be able to restrict her intake?? I have found my shetland gets worse when locked up...more stiff, sore and grumpy looking...but by being in with the others, they help to 'encourage movement' :whistling: as he is the bottom of the herd heirachy most of the time -_-

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Hi Sue,

Yes, I think it would be a great idea. I just haven't found the time to get out and do it.

At the moment I have a rotation system, lots of small paddocks rotated weekly. I can just see marty's face when I tell him I want to re-arrange all the fencing, lol. Thank godness for electric tape hey.

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Tracey while we've been on the subject of ponying...........have you considered this, taking her with you when you play with the others?

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Hi Everyone,

Sorry Nicole I missed your last post, yes I do take her out with the others ;)

 

Well I am so pleased with how these are coming along. Look how far down the forcing grooves have grown. I think it will be only a few more trims (about 6 weeks I reckon ) and I'll be able to take the last of the dead lamine off. The new hoof growth is straight and strong. Her soles are looking great. I think they will always a funny shape though. The wall is improving from back towards the front. I haven't been able to level her up completely yet, but with each trim I've tried my best with what I had to work with. Again I think this will improve over the next few weeks.

 

She is trotting around playing with the others alot now. Somtimes kicks her heals up and goes for a canter, so good to see. And she is absolutely wonderful around the little people, my 3 yr old can pat her, feed her and rug her and she doesn't push into him or crowd him. I think she has a home for life now. :)

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wow, aren't they just looking amazing. Well done Tracey - my hat is off to you.

 

'cole

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Unreal..... you clever girl!!!

 

Very impressive!

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Thanks for your lovely comments and support. It's not something I want to go through again, I have definately learnt somethinig so it was a positive experience.

 

With the spring rains and green shoots, her feet did heat up a few weeks ago, so I expect there will be another laminitic event show up :( ,

 

Peter, if I continue with the trims will the lamine sepration be less then last time, or is it possible it will be another big flare up?

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wow one sweet and lucky pony. What a great post, thanks so much Peter and Tracey.

all best with this recuperation,

Ruby

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:clapping:Wow Tracey that is amazing, how brave are you and what a very lucky pony. And here I was thinking I was pretty good trimming my horses feet(also instructed by Peter)and he only has a bug problem in one of his feet :D

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Hi there, wow how exciting - one day I'd love to learn to do my own horses feet, but for now I have a fabulous farrier so will stick with him :-) good on you Tracey. I just wanted to add that I have an australian pony who is prone to founder - but hasn't now for about 2-3 years. It took me 7 years of trying different things before I found what worked for him and it won't necesssarily for you but anyway can't hurt to throw my two cents worth in :whistling:

Ernie has to be locked in a small yard during autumn and spring. I let him out for a few hours graze once or twice a week but anymore then that and he will begin showing signs of foundering (thickened crest etc). Year round I feed him Wheaten chaff with the bran and minerals as mentioned above - I have found the oaten chaff contributes to his foundering also. But most importantly I add epsom salts to his feed when he is having a bout of founder or on the verge of it. Beginning with 2 desertspoonfuls a day and weaning down to a teaspoon a day until he is back to normal. It seems to have made a big difference. I know long term use of these salts are not recommended for their health but have found them instrumental in helping Ernie to heal.

Good luck!!

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Thanks Brooke and Leah,

 

Yes the diet thing has been a challenge, she lost a lot of weight as I tried to reduce all the 'bad for her feet' food. She seems to have stabilised and put condition back on so she looks healthy. I welcome other people's experiences or suggestions as there may be something I haven't thought of or tried yet, :) so thank-you.

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Ah!....nice job Trace. You're doing so well and look at the improvement. Fabulous!

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Hi Leah,

 

Thanks for posting this re: epsom salts (magnesium). Pat Coleby's solution to Laminitus/founder = more magnesium too. Just been backed up by recent study in Canada - magnesium deficiency key to insulin resistance in humans too - controls blood sugar.

 

Kaz

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G’day All!!!

 

I would like to add a small cautionary word about people with all the answers…

 

The reality is that we do not have all the answers…

 

BUT

 

We do know some of the issues…

 

Laminitis and founder are made worse by magnesium deficiencies and supplementing magnesium is part of our prevention and cure regime..

 

But it is not the magic answer…

 

Pat, and I, would stress that first the best thing is to ensure that the soil, pasture and feed are not magnesium, (or any other mineral) deficient.

 

After that, supplementing Mg as Epsom salts can have severe unwanted side effects (like scouring)… Supplementing Mg as Dolomite is almost impossible to overdose, and is cheap, and the rest of the bag can be thrown on the pasture.

 

Adding crushed basalt to the horses’ environment also can both add Mg to the soil and will give excellent benefits in reducing soil acidity… and in reducing hoof surface acidity and thus “The Bug” which now becomes a complication in our foundered broken hoofs.

 

We still have to come back to the fact that the cause of 80% of all laminitis and founder is caused by sugar /starch overload of the hindgut.

 

The next greatest cause is “veterinary intervention” in the form of immunizations, (inappropriate) antibiotics, wormers, confinement etc…

 

There are a small number of other causes, all of which can, and should, be managed out of our horses’ life.

 

There are no magic answers if we persist in the inappropriate use of incorrect food and medicine and ignoring basic mineral requirements.

 

There are no magic answers if we persist in poor management.

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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Hi Tracey

 

How is your little fellow going? You were doing such an amazing job.

 

I am really interested in the integrity of the hoof as I see on a daily basis the problems that occur in the horses body if the feet are right. As the old saying goes 'No hoof No horse.

 

Cheers

Dorinda

 

 

Cheers

Dorinda

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I can't believe its been 4 years since we went through this experience.

Minty's feet grew out to be healthy. She went on to be the most trustworthy childs pony i have ever meet. She sadly past away at the end of last year, but was very muched loved and had the best last few years a pony could ask for.

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Hi Trace, I have thought of this post many times in the past and just recently again, both my ponies feet are in trouble... well all my horses actually, I need to get to a clinic somewhere as soon as I get home... 4 years how time flies, water passes under the bridge doesnt it!

Glad to hear that Minti had a very happy home and im sure she was soooo grateful for you help.

Thanks for the shove!

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