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Guest Barelover

My Horse Has Bone Spavin, How To Trim?

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Guest Barelover

My lovely 10 year old riding pony mare has just been diagnosed and treated (hock injections, 3 days box rest, 1 month paddock rest) Question is how do I trim her hinds to make her more comfortable?

I have had a bit of a struggle with a slightly longer inside heel for a little while.

Thanks. Helen

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G’day Hellen!!!

 

I would love to tell you that there was some magic extra thing you could do to bring more comfort to this pony but I am afraid that there is probably not much you can do except the normal “keeping the foot balanced”.

 

Keeping the toes fairly short (horizontally–backwards) is standard and you should make sure you keep this standard.

 

If the inside heel flares continually, you should remove all of the flare and lower that side of the hoof …little and often… until the flare minimises… this will probably be the “best” balance possible.

 

You, and all of us, should take the opportunity to learn from your distress that “spavins”, “wind galls”, “bowed tendons” and many other arthrosis problems are caused by using our horses too early, or above their level of fitness, and that once the damaged is done there is little we can do other than spend heartache and money trying to keep them comfortable.

 

We should learn to avoid these problems with our next horses if we can.

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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:clapping: :clapping: :clapping:

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Guest Barelover

Hi Peter,

 

Thanks for your reply! It is actually the outside wall that likes to flare and the inside wall grows down as it should, but the heel looks too low already ( on the inside), so I am reluctant to take it down further.

 

Cheers

Helen

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Peter . . . . I love your comments and explanations :clapping: You manage to put things in such a nice simple, easy to understand way . . . . great advice :thumbsup:

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G’day Helen!!!

 

We should all do a one day Balance clinic! What we are talking about here is “Mediolateral Balance”.

 

Just to clarify… You did, originally, say QUOTE: I have had a bit of a struggle with a slightly longer inside heel

 

So just to make it clear for everyone, regardless of whether it is the “inside” or “outside”; normally the flared side is longest and needs to be shortened and the other side should be left alone as much as possible.

 

The low side heel may move forward…. The frog may drift towards the high side… the low side laminar bar will be more upright and the long side bar will be less upright…

 

The “low side” will be wearing away naturally but we must remove both the flare and the extra hoofwall from the high side…

 

This has nothing to do with the actual “length” of the hoofwall in either side or even whether the hoofwall is “longer than the natural sole on the “long” side. (Though it probably will be.)

It is about the bottom of the hoof being as close as possible to “parallel to the P2/P3 pivot axis” and ensuring that if one side wears away, we trim the other side to match.

 

Little and often is best but sometimes I need to “just do it” and make a big change… however the owner still needs to maintain this as the hoof grows and wears…

 

Last weekend we did a “Just do it job” on Mel’s mare Abbey (actually Mel did the entire job herself). No doubt Abby will have been a bit sore for a while but in future the trimming should be the “little and often” and Abby probably will not even miss a beat each time…

 

We will just have to wait for Mel’s story as the project develops…

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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Quote: It is about the bottom of the hoof being as close as possible to “parallel to the P2/P3 pivot axis” and ensuring that if one side wears away, we trim the other side to match.

 

 

Thanks Peter, this line right here is worth millions to me. This has really cleared up exactly what we did with the laminitic pony - he had a pronounced imbalance, now much less noticeable, in fact when trimming him today I had to really figure which hind foot it was. Yay.

Thanks Helen for asking the squestion.

'cole

 

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Hi Peter,

I am just waiting on the pictures before I post our story - Abbey has recovered quite well and I even rode her on the weekend after a lot of checking her out online before hand. I am about to go out and do her next trim, I have noticed in the last couple of days she is starting to twist her legs more as she walks which wasn't as noticeable after we trimmed her.

 

Helen, I am really sorry to hear of your horses diagnosis. I am interested to hear how you go with making her more comfortable.

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just checking - that sole parallel to the joint, we verify that when we put the rasp across the flat of the heels and flex the joint and then note the arc that the rasp describes. The rasp visually magnifies (shows up) any mediolateral imbalance by executing a conical arc; thus showing up the high and low sides.

 

'cole

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G’day All!!!

 

Well when I checked ‘Cole's founder pony I could not tell that there was, or ever had been, any mediolateral imbalance.. She had just fixed it!

 

BUT: This is not always possible or, it may take a long time.

 

However it is ALWAYS better to be working in the problem rather than ignoring it or making it get worse!

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

Edited by Peter Laidely

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Guest Barelover

Hi All, and thankyou all for your imput.

My horse has had a full lameness workup at Gatton Uni, including x rays, ultrasound and of course flexion tests.

The specialist vet recommended cortisone injections into the hock to relieve pain and encourage the joint to fuse (we are talking about end stage arthritis here)

Was then on 3 days box rest, and is now on 1 month paddock rest with no work.

Now back to what you wrote, Peter. The flared wall is def the shorter side (lateral). She does have a bit of a funny foot, as when you pick up the hind leg to sight the balance, it sort of cocks dramatically, not sure if you have any hints on this prob. If you were to do the T square trick on this foot, you would clearly see the imbalance.

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE for you to come over for some of your knowlegde, I could definiately get a few people together for that!

Thanks again

Helen

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G’day Helen!!!

 

OK we are talking two different stories, or singing from two different hymn books here…

 

“Shorter side” and “flare” are not on the same page of my hymn book…

 

As I said before; the “shorter side may seem “longer” if we use a ruler or measuring device… it is about “parallel to the P2/P3 axis” NOT about “how long” it is…

 

Sigh…

 

I would love to come and explain it to you if you can get a few folk to share the cost,

 

Where are you exactly??

 

If you can get to Gatton you may be outside my home trimming area but you can’t be too far from me for a teaching day.

 

Can you get half a dozen friends that want, or need, to learn some more real hoof care??

 

Invite your local trimmers and farriers.. All welcome!!!

 

I may not be “Saint Peter” but I sure know a lot more than traditional teaching in this subject…

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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Guest Barelover

Hi,

Things get about as clear as mud on a forum dont they?

OK...what I should have said was the flared side, when the flare is taken care of is shorter than the inside. Would photos be of any help, will try to get some.

I am at Regency Downs, just near Plainlands. How much would you charge? I could get a few interested people.

Cheers

Helen

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G’day Helen!!!

 

Yes some pictures would help. Also a lot of the other folk here will both be interested to share your project and give their “two bob’s worth” of good advice as well.

 

Normally we charge about $150.00 per person / per day for clinics… Plus travel costs… if you get at least six attendees I can drive to Planelands for free. And if you do get six or more (not counting yourself) you do not pay! (However you will probably need to put in at least $150.00 worth of blood, sweat and tears...) Perhaps one or two of the folk who have done this before can give you advice and tell you if it is worth the effort. It is a lot of work but we usually have a lot of fun and learning experiences.

 

Peter Laidely

www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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If this party ends up being in september around time of insstructors week ( 15-21 ) I will put my hand up - Kind regards Dr. deb

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Guest Theresa

My Morgan gelding has bone spavin also is 11 yrs old never shod. Had injections in November. & was put on daily previcox & recent X-ray shows the beginning of fusion taking place but when not on previcox very lame at trot was also wondering if I should do anything different in the trim . His right is worse than the left & he def. drags that toe more. Is a big beautiful guy so sad vet says when fused can be used as normal don't know how long that takes & how painful is the lite exercise he gets daily

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