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HarvestMoon

Advice Please - Barefoot Pony Now A Bit Footy

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I'd like some advice as to what to do with Harvey.

 

Harvey has been barefoot for about 2.5yrs he had been shod before that but I don't know for how long. Up until recently he was kept out most of the time on 6 acres of meadowland shared with one other pony. He isn't overweight, being quite a poor doer and has hayledge or hay when needed. He is and has for ages been fed a balcancer. He doesn't get any feeds that contain cereals being kept on a mainly fibre and oil diet when more is needed during winter. His field there was fairly flat.

 

Work wise he was ridden or worked on grass (paddock) or very occasionally walked and trotted on smooth roads for up to 30 mins at a time.

 

Since moving yards he has been very stuffy in his work and difficult to get to do tranisitons without high phases. This was in the sand school where he is ridden the majority of the time now. He is also footy coming in and out of the field which is to be expected as it is gravel. He even seems a bit footy in the field when turned out and I haven't seen him do more then walk slowly in the field although the field does have rougher terrain with more hills. It is meadow/moorland with a river at the bottom of one side which then goes up the other side.

 

I took him for a hack (trail ride) today and he kept trying to walk on the grass verges when on stony tracks and when on the road. On the gravel path that leads back to the yard he kept tripping over and almost seemed lame where he was so footy. It wasn't very nice watching him pick his way over it. He was more forward going on the trail then he was in the school though.

 

There is no heat in his feet and he isn't laminitis prone at all. He is currently living out on 20 acres with 15 other horses but will probably come in at night in the winter so he can be fed hay to keep his weight on.

 

He was last trimmed 4 weeks ago and is due to be trimmed again in the next 2-4weeks although his feet do seem quite 'short' I have never had any problems with footiness when being trimmed before.

 

My other pony has always been barefoot and hasn't had any problems at all since moving yards.

 

So ...can i have some suggestions as it seems like he is needing shoes but I don't want to shoe him unless it is a neccessity.

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Hi there,

 

If you have been working him alot in the sand this can be quite abrasive so he may have worn away more sole/hoof wall to make him a bit ouchy. It could also be the change in paddock, if there are higher sugar content in the pasture he may be experiencing mild laminitic changes. Have you discussed the issue with your trimmer at all??

 

My bet would be the sand arena if you have been previously working on grass and natural ground, you may find that you are going to need to boot him up in the arean for a while, or be really aware of how much "play" in the sand arena his hooves are able to take, it can be a bit of a balancing act some times to keep them feeling good on their hooves with such an abrasive surface. If he seems short to you, especially 4 weeks after a trim this may be the case.

 

By the way if you are worrying about boots in sand arenas I've done it before and they are usually fine, just got to remember to take them off and make sure there isn't any sand in them if you want to go out for a ride after.

 

cheers

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Hi,

does he have thrush in & around his frogs, any seedy toe. Pick up his feet & see if they smell funny. His heels maybe low, when was he trimmed last.

ask Peter, hes the guy to help.

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G’day Sarah!!!

 

 

No living creature needs pieces of steel mailed to their living, or keratinised epithelial, structures.

 

Some humans believe that they need to do this to other living creatures.

 

This fat, bald, old, human has his own bigoted ideas and beliefs.

 

But you have to make up your own mind about what you need to do.

 

BUT:

 

If your horse is not sound and healthy without horseshoes, neither will it be sound and healthy with horseshoes.

 

The real answer is to find what it WRONG… and fix the cause.

 

Almost certainly in your environment you horse DOES have at least low grade laminitis…

 

Mine do not, bur many or my local clients also have this problem…

 

Almost certainly you, or your trimmer, can overcome this by CHANGING your management and/ or micro environment.

 

If this is too hard, then you can always try the horseshoe path…

 

It definitely may offer short term benefits although almost certainly at the cost of long term damage to your horse.

 

But it is your horse and you must do what you feel is best.

 

Peter Laidely www.hoofworksaustralia.com

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Hi,

does he have thrush in & around his frogs, any seedy toe. Pick up his feet & see if they smell funny. His heels maybe low, when was he trimmed last.

ask Peter, hes the guy to help.

 

Hi, no he feet 'look' ok no smells or seedy toe etc, heels and frog seem good. He was trimmed last about 4-5 weeks ago. Soles are uneven but I think that is a good thing? Farrier never takes any sole away.

G’day Sarah!!!

 

 

No living creature needs pieces of steel mailed to their living, or keratinised epithelial, structures.

 

Some humans believe that they need to do this to other living creatures.

 

This fat, bald, old, human has his own bigoted ideas and beliefs.

 

But you have to make up your own mind about what you need to do.

 

BUT:

 

If your horse is not sound and healthy without horseshoes, neither will it be sound and healthy with horseshoes.

yes agree with this which is why i am reluctant to have him shod.

The real answer is to find what it WRONG… and fix the cause.

yes that's what I want to do but I can't tell what's wrong? Vet says not lame enough to test if lameness in leg or hoof eg.nerve block but would happily do a back x-ray (he is insured at the moment will be exempt from that leg end of november) He had hock x-rays earlier in the year when he was similar which came back clear, personally i think he is slightly bilateraly lame. He has no pain in sole when testing for laminitis but agree it's not above a possibility.

Almost certainly in your environment you horse DOES have at least low grade laminitis…

 

Mine do not, bur many or my local clients also have this problem…

So how do i combat this if this is the case? I can bring him off grass at night and feed hay and he is on poor quality moorland grazing not lush or cow grazing. I don't want to muzzle him during the day as he is in a herd and wouldn't be able to mutual groom and would lose too much weight. He doesn't have any lami indicators in feet such as rings etc. I can't restrict grazing at current yard but can restrict time at grass. He isn't fed apart from vits and mins at the moment and in winter he gets fed when he loses too much weight. All feed already happens to be suitable for a laminitic as it is suitable for ulcers which he has suffered from in the past so very low sugar (no mollasses etc) no cereals and fibre and oil based.

Almost certainly you, or your trimmer, can overcome this by CHANGING your management and/ or micro environment.

I am currently trying to find another farrier as mine doesn't come out to my new area. I have a choice between barefoot pro farriers eg. won't suggest shoes to correct or a barefoot trimmer. Farrier would cost me around £25 a trim every 8weeks or earlier when needed as recommended, barefoot trimmer (sarah swallow?) would charge me £44 per horse and would want to add me to her list every 6 weeks.

I don't mind using whichever would be best but will admit the barefoot farrier is expensive and i'm not sure which to use. Neither would make me shoe, both would help, barefoot trimmer more geared towards boots but i don't think really he should need them as he hasn't up to now really. Again like a shoe i don't want boots to just mask a problem.

I am happy to change the environment as best as i can

If this is too hard, then you can always try the horseshoe path…

 

It definitely may offer short term benefits although almost certainly at the cost of long term damage to your horse.

I haven't discounted shoes but i would never be happy shoeing a uncomfy horse and if it isn't uncomfy then it shoeing wouldn't come up?!

But it is your horse and you must do what you feel is best.

 

Peter Laidely www.hoofworksaustralia.com

 

So i look forward to your suggestions! :-)

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Just to add a lot of people (including vet) have said that i see lameness too early and that i worry too much. That the 'slight' lameness i see most people would ride on like there is nothing wrong. Vet commented when previously similar that 85% of horses he see are slightly lame (with/without shoes) and still competing like it etc. It has been suggested that i give him bute on the days he is slightly sore (to my eye) and carry on as normal.

 

Today 5 out of the 6 people at my yard said he was very slightly off on his near hind but that they would turn out and ride etc as normal. One mentioned her shetland always has a gait like that and she thinks nothing of it. Another said her (barefoot) cob is always footy on gravel and stones but they just pick their way around a grass edge and don't worry about it.

 

Now i don't agree with all the above and yes i probably do see lameness very early on but is it so wrong to want a comfy horse? surely it is wrong to disregard it even if it is slight? or am i just a worrier that worry's too much?

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Guest caohmin

goodness....well I think that's great if you are detecting a gait abnormalitity early and by golly hear your horsie......in the endurance world a 1/5 lameness on the straight and 2/5 on a circle can be deemed fit to continue (I agree with this concept NOT)....same grade lameness, no heat no swelling and minor pain reaction in my own athlete - was scanned by scintigraphy and ultrasound to diagnose a check ligament and suspensory lig strain......and to add to that - early detection and correct rehab brought this horse back to being a 100mile distance horse after 18mths.....................and still sound to date............

I compete my QH barefoot - the things I would advocate to success are a knowledgable kind barefoot trimmer whom will teach you how to maintain things, patience and knowing your limitations in what you wish to do riding wise, and look into gloves/boots as a means of assistance to training and preparing to ride barefoot................

is your horse lame/foot sore on all terrains just now and have you localised it to one limb or multiple? is he more lame on the lunge?

Rach

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goodness....well I think that's great if you are detecting a gait abnormalitity early and by golly hear your horsie......in the endurance world a 1/5 lameness on the straight and 2/5 on a circle can be deemed fit to continue (I agree with this concept NOT)....same grade lameness, no heat no swelling and minor pain reaction in my own athlete - was scanned by scintigraphy and ultrasound to diagnose a check ligament and suspensory lig strain......and to add to that - early detection and correct rehab brought this horse back to being a 100mile distance horse after 18mths.....................and still sound to date............

I compete my QH barefoot - the things I would advocate to success are a knowledgable kind barefoot trimmer whom will teach you how to maintain things, patience and knowing your limitations in what you wish to do riding wise, and look into gloves/boots as a means of assistance to training and preparing to ride barefoot................

is your horse lame/foot sore on all terrains just now and have you localised it to one limb or multiple? is he more lame on the lunge?

Rach

Hi Rach,

 

He is lame in his hinds really, near hind more but possibly both. No more then 1/5 on grass or smooth concrete on the straight though, and 2/5 over gravel/harder going though. About the same when on a circle. It's hard to explain but he looks stiff in the hips and almost just has a slight dish action to his off hind. When going over gravel he is tentative with his hinds but otherwise tracking up well etc.

 

Up to now, apart from these hinds going squiffy occasionally (and at inopportune moments!) he had been going great barefoot and had been barefoot for over 2yrs. He transitioned really easily and was never lame even on roads when transitiong. His feet don't look bad either.

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perhaps then it is a matter of looking at whats going on up higher...sacral area, hamstrings and guteals there the usual areas of issue I have found...........my wee QH is having lots of trouble just now making transitions and doesnt matter the terrain/ground, tracking up but gosh he looks like he wants to cry as he makes the transition - so we are going through bowen, acupucture and some other therapy modalities along side some gymnastic work with no rider as yet to see how this may improve him - will let you know................so may questions horses provoke and not enough answers eh.....

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perhaps then it is a matter of looking at whats going on up higher...sacral area, hamstrings and guteals there the usual areas of issue I have found...........my wee QH is having lots of trouble just now making transitions and doesnt matter the terrain/ground, tracking up but gosh he looks like he wants to cry as he makes the transition - so we are going through bowen, acupucture and some other therapy modalities along side some gymnastic work with no rider as yet to see how this may improve him - will let you know................so may questions horses provoke and not enough answers eh.....

 

yes, sounds like Harvey was. Incidentally Harvey has gone back to being sound again now. Which is good but bad. Good because he is sound but bad beause I can't investigate the cause of the problem if you know what i mean.

 

Good luck with your QH and keep me updated!

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Hi Sarah, everyone here has brought up some good possibilities and options. I would really recommend attending a barefoot maintenance clinic. Of course by a reputable Barefoot professional. I attended one last weekend with all the QS girls out here in the outback by Andrew Bowe. It was the 2nd time I have attended the beginners clinic and I got so much out of it.

 

This time I understood so much more about the biomechanics of the leg and hoof structure, landing heel first etc, and that a shoulder problem can lead to toe first landing, causing more trouble..... I have just put Leroy in boots. He injured is HQ, the sacro area with lots of tears, strains and was in a bad way, this in turn led to bad 4qtrs due to all the compensating, that led to all strains etc and incorrect landing of the hoof. So with lots of stretches, some acupuncture, some natural remedies and a bit of butizone (used for the pelvic area) that he has come a long way in the last month and a half. so it just goes to show that id doesn't necessarily need to start with a foot problem but can quickly lead to a nasty one if their bio-mechanics aren't working properly

 

I would still look at treating him as a whole, get some boots, trim him a bit more regularly than 6 weeks... i imagine his toe will grow out a bit much in that time. Do some stretches with him and see how it goes. Andrew said "that putting a pair of boots on your horse is like having them run on Nike Airs" I have played a lot of sports in the past and know the difference from a pair of volleys to the good old Nike's. And if his foot isnt working internally like it should be, then he might just be running on Volleys. It may help him loosen right up again.

 

Good luck with it. There is nothing worse than not knowing how to help and just waiting to see!!! Keen to hear how you go!!!

 

Cheers

Jill.

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Hi Sarah

 

Good on you in trying to help your horse. No horse should be in pain and taken as the norm. This is incompetance at its worst.

 

I have being having the same issues with my horse Maggie. In all in tense and purpose you would think just ride but there are issues that WILL come out if you do. Hamstrings become tight, lumbar areas become tense and over reactive to pressures, shoulders become painful etc etc. The whole horse needs to be treated. In Maggies case she will just lay her ears back and try to bit you off her back. She is totally intolerant of discomfort and I have to really concentrate to undersatnd her.

 

I know that you are not supposed to think that there is any one mineral or vitamin that will fix all but I know for a fact that with Maggie the introduction of Magnesium Chloride has done wonders. She is much softer through the back and more flexible that she is not trying to bit me off her back anymore. I am have some really great rides with her at the moment and we are gradually getting onto of her pain, which I might add is coming from her feet. Diet I think has a great role to play in these things and we need to address this more. She has always toe landed and now she is just starting to use her heels. I also do body work on her and excersises that help in her flexibility.

 

Putting boots on will not be detrimental as they will still allow the pressure through the leg to the digital cushion to help with blood circulation. Shoes do not allow this so I would go for boots.

 

You mentioned that you thought that Harveys feet were too short. Does he have upright pasterns as this will put undue strain on the ligaments/tendons withside the hoof capsule. Are you able to post any photos for us to have a look at. Get lateral, caudal, cranial and obliques views. Maybe some side photos of your horse standing square.

 

The other thing that may have happended is that he has had a fall or some twisiting that may have put something out. Where does he fit in the herd?

 

Anyway keep us posted on how you go.

 

Cheers

Dorinda

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always a fascinating topic and great to see so many QS standing up for their horses and paying attention to the details ! this is where we can help our horses the most and avoid the bigger issues, Its a pity not all vets get the wellness message! - lameness or unevenness is always important and yes sometimes it does require more movement to improve things but in conjunction with management /rehab and diet !! ( as you are doing ) As a chiro/acupuncture/podiatry vet I see a lot of lameness and i must say I do far less nerve blocks these days _ if the lameness is in the foot I wiil often put a pair of boots on at the clinic to assist my diagnosis ( we keep a pair in every size for this purpose ) The horse must land heel first ( as should humans ...no stilletoes !! ) and boots will greatly assist this and stimulate heel bulb receptor function ( see dr.bob bowkers (USA) research ) I preserve the solar callous ( between 10 and 2 at the toe religiously as even a couple of mm can make a big difference here and the can just be a matter of individual farrier style. I will aso suggest that people periodically ride their horse in boots to see what there potential movement is and make sure you are achieving the same without them. I find X rays of limited value ( certainly back xrays !!) as most changes are soft tissue or cartilage in these early cases and i would rather spend the money on other forms of diagnosis and response to treatment.Many Xray changes are not clinically relevant.Most clinical issues can be diagnosed using my veterinary chiropractic knowledge and podiatry skills/flexion tests. I do look at nutrition ( sugars in the grasses imp but also like magnesium/vit e and selenium as well as joint health products glucosamine/condroitin/msm ( the new jointguard plus from naturevet has been excellent )How old and what type of horse is harvey ?? glad he's feeling better but hope this gives you a head start if it happens again............( these late night chats are good arent they ? I think i can get back to sleep now )yinyang.gif

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Guest Harvestmoon

Thank you everyone!

 

Harvey stayed sound for some time since i started this post, still barefoot and doing fine - til last week or so. He is footy again now but only in hinds really. On our last ride (in walk, mainly on grass but some flinty areas) i had to get off and walk home as he was really lame on his hind leg and on getting home although there was no heat etc there was a red mark on the outside of his hoof wall about half way up, horizontaly. I kept him in overnight and the red mark has pretty much gone now, vey saw him before i turned him out...

 

He is 2/5 lame again, mainly on near hind. Vet came today to look at other pony (who has got to go for investigation for possible saccrolliac problem) and said she does not think Harvey has any lami at all. (although at my request as i had a money off voucher she has tested for cushings and insulin resistance too) She thinks it is where the hoof is not keeping up with,wear/possible stone bruising and has said to shoe him all round.

 

I don't really want to shoe him and my farrier is going to come and discuss on thursday (he likes to keep them barefoot if poss but will shoe if you ask for it). I am considering putting boots on first ????? Is there a crash course in fixing and buying the right size??? Are the boots likely to be short term? (I do compete in dressage and SJ and cannot compete in hoof boots)

 

He is footy over stones/gravel regardless of whether he is ridden on them or just walked in hand over. he walks on grass ridden or led fine.

 

Harvey is 15, Welsh x Arab, not overweight (can see ribs slightly) gelding, but is riggy/hormonal. Currently out with other pony (who is lami prone so they are out when lami risk of grass is low). Feed wise he only gets at the moment a scoop of speedibeet and will be restarting his balancer (or a vit and min supplement haven't decided yet) soon as i ran out a week ago. I was thinking of buying him mag ox too and have a joint supplement (suppleaze gold) that i want to try him on. He has poor quality soaked hay when in.

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Hi

 

Any red signs in the hoof are definately a sign that the laminae has been damaged. I would not be putting a shoe on this hoof as it will only damage to hoof further. I am working closely with a farrier to help a horse recover from major bruising of the laminae. The horse also has red within the hoof from concusion. We do not feel that putting shoes on will be a long term solution. The farrier is addressing medial flares and I am concentrating on the body side of things. This horse also has a bowed tendon which has begun to reduce in size. Maintaining a good trim will certainly be a positive for your horse.

 

Any Magnesium would be great. I use MgCl as it is better absorbed. It has been great for Maggie and her feet are so much better. Getting a heel landing now. It has also helped with her muscling. She is a much happier horse these days. MSM is also a great addition to the diet

 

Do you have any pictures of the hoof so we can see more

 

I would get more advice from Peter before proceeding.

 

Oh yes check out this web site. It is agreat resource if you are looking at buying boots. They will help to heel the foot without the invasion of shoes.

 

http://www.easycaredownunder.com.au/page15.htm

 

 

 

Cheers

Dorinda

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Thank you Dorinda,

 

I will have a look at the site and try and take some pics either tomorrow or wednesday of the said feet - they do actually look like 'nice' feet it's just a pity he is footy on them!

 

the red is very faint (comes and goes) and is on the outside of the hoof wall about half way up - is that likely to be due to concussion do you think? There is nothing on the sole.

 

He does get a balancer (no cereal low starch and sugar) which has mag in but i am going to also start feeding more magnesium oxide on top to up the levels. I have just bought a joint supplement which has msm in (suppleaze gold) so will also start that.

 

Just to add more to the mix and pick your brains even more - my other pony is a laminitic mare that was gifted to me 7 months ago. when i got her she was lame with acute laminitis after she recovered from this she had no other bouts of laminitis but farrier did a lot of work to help her pedal bone as her soles were red and at one point there was a red crescent just forward of the frog which i think was the pedal bone pushing through. she did become more sound but recently went to the vets as is lame behind (slightly) vet has taken x-rays of her feet. She has 10% rotation and the pedal bone has dropped a bit although the last 6 months of growth has done wonders for it. (She is barefoot btw and always has been) to make matters worse she has fairly severe arthiritis in the hocks, the vet thinks from years of putting weight onto her hinds to help her then untreated fronts. (her last owner never took her to the vet for anything or thought anything was particularly wrong).

 

Vet cannot offer a lot of hope. They do not want to medicate the hocks with steroids as her pedal bones could not put up with another bout of laminitis that it may trigger. They have said to keep her on bute long term and continue light work in walk and trot unless she gets more uncomfortable then the bute can manage.

 

Obvouisly there are a lot of things i can't change but i am willing to boot/pad her fronts and work with my farrier to make her as sound as possible for as long as possible. Will also take pics of her feet to put on here.

 

btw she is my childrens 'first' pony, a complete angel who loves all children and is teaching them to walk, trot and go on hacks on and off the lead as well as general pony care. She is a 12.2hh welsh x spotted pony (like a rather fine sec A) believed to be somewhere between 16 and 22yrs old.

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Guest dorinda

Hi

 

Yes post some photos and if you can take them with a outside/front/back views from ground level and a picture of the sole. Also for your pony.

 

With the radiographs of the pony were there any signs of boney changes in the navicular bone?

 

Cheers

Dorinda

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Here are the x-rays of Ellie my 12.2hh pony. These were taken not ideally when she was due a trim. Farrier says that the x-rays would now look instantly a bit better now she has had a trim. He is in agreeance she needs to stay barefoot (or with imprint stick on shoes) and carry on building a new foot aroud the new bone position.

 

elliex-ray1.jpg

elliexray2.jpg

 

and these are harveys feet - he has had a trim now so these were taken when he was due a trim.

 

photo-11.jpg

photo-10.jpg

photo-8.jpg

photo-7.jpg

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Just a thought - Uniform Hoof wall thickness.

 

Harvey doesn't have it. He is showing flares - lots of them. I think theses flares are the reason that you are seeing pink in the wall as the laminae becomes inflamed and then gets additional pressure on it as the wall flares out . The coronet band and the bottom of the hoof should be the same shape, and what I see at ground level is a box shape instead of that lovely tight arc.

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Hi Nicole, yes he was due a trim when the photo's were taken so all the flare is now gone, One of the reasons he isn't trimmed sooner is because if his feet get too short at the toe then he gets lame/very footy.

 

He has been trimmed now and was advised to possibly have a tidy up at a interval between trimming, tidy rather then trim.

Secondly we have now moved yards. Farrier thought our previous yard may have been causing some of the trouble as it was a marsh predominently so quite wet most of the year. There was also a lot of gravel/flint/pea shingle to cross every day, minimum of maybe 400m a day where he had to walk over gravel/flint etc more if hacking. I did have front shoes put on him as he was really struggling with the gravel and it seemes lile it was bruising his soles a bit - farrier thinks they can come off again next trim so really just a temporary measure until we were on better land.

 

Now we have moved Harvey is doing a lot lot better. He no longer has anywhere near as much gravel/flint to cross although he does still have to walk on some when hacking and he is sounder then he has looked for a while! No more footiness. The ground here is better grass (less stressed meadow grass/old pasture) and not wet.

 

Ellie is doing a bit better too. Both are out at night and currently come in for a few hours during the day with soaked hay and Ellie is happy enough wearing her grazing muzzle when out as well which we couldn't use at the other yard as the other horses bullied her and she couldn't defend herself with it on. (she still has other horses here for company and shares a paddock with Harvey who she gets on well with though.)

 

I will attempt to get new photo's of both now both have been trimmed.

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Hey Sarah,

 

If he is wearing his toe away faster than the rest, that suggests to me that he is still landing toe first and needs a bit more rebalancing to the rear.

So get your farrier to take a bit more than he/she would usually off the heel, then over a period allow him to get used to using his feet heel first.

This will stretch a few things, and may therefore be best done gradually. I think of it as being like when you first learned to ride with your heels down; it felt very wierd doing it, and your muscles and even some of your joints were a bit tired afterwards, but now you can't imagine it being any other way.

 

'cole

Edited by Nicole

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Guest dorinda

Hi Sarah

 

I agree with Nicole there is something that your horse that is telling us if he is not landing on his heels. You need to take a wholistic approach here to determne the cause. To get to the bottom of that you need to do some more investigation. Radiographs of his feet would be a good start to see what is going on internally. It is good that your farrier is addressing the flares as these tell us that there is some internal damage being done to the laminae. Generally the connection is not as it should be so by addressing the flares you are helping the laminae to reconnect. Check with Peter about diet as diet is very crucial here to get a good laminae connection. Your farrier must take down the heels slowly as Nicole says so as not to put undue stress on the Deep digital flexor tendon. This inserts on the semi lunar crest of the coffin bone (PIII)

 

My mare Maggie has been toe landing for years and it has not been until recently say the last two months that she has started to bear some weight on the heels. She was foot sore for ages couldn't walk on gravel etc. But now she is able to walk along beside me and step where ever I go with out trying to seek the softer ground. It has taken over a year to even start to get some sort of concavity in the sole so it is a long process.

 

When you take pictures next can we have some from the lateral (side), back and front view. All square on and as close to the ground level as possible.

 

I have started to do a radiograph course so that I can understand how to read them better so if it is okay with you and only with your permision can I discuss your mares radio graphs with some collegues? No names wil be mentioned

 

Cheers

Dorinda

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Hi both of you - i have got to go in a min so will reply more fully later but just wanted to say - Dorinda yes that is fine to discuss Ellie's radiographs.

 

Farrier is very open so will tell him what you suggest too and see his view on it as well. Harvey has been a lot better since we moved yards though and isn't footy at the moment at all.

 

Ellie is on very restricted grass and muzzled when out. she had a bit of a set back yesterday as her digital pulse ran a little high and her feet were warm so she is back in her stable for now. Her muzzle is starting to rub her under the chin so i have got to see if i can adapt it or line it with something somehow.

 

Both have very little in way of sugar in their diet and currently have soaked hay, meadow grass (out at night in during day, ellie out even less and muzzled). feed wise they get speedibeet, global herbs globalvite (which i am changing to equimins meta balance vit and minerals which is better balanced for uk hay/soils) Ellie also has half a bute twice a day and a tiny amount of glucosamine (vet prescribed both - glucosamine is not ideal but needed for her arthiritis as the pluses outweigh the minuses). Harvey just has the globalvite with his speedibeet and suppleaze gold joint supplement.

 

I have ordered some linseed to try them both on (micronised) and have ordered some mag ox to add to their feeds too.

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:)

they are lucky they have you.

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