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tijrocky

PLEASE HELP WITH HOOF

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Can anybody give advice on what I can try to save my girl. She is 13. Purchased her 18months ago. She had this problem however has gotten worse since having foal. She gets biotin and phosmix as well as seaweed meal. she get shod every 4-6 weeks. Please give what advice you can as I am will to try anything at this point.

Thanks in advance

 

 

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Hi there,

 

So if you are asking this question you are contemplating removing the shoes. Can you tell us a bit more about the mare and her hoof, as she has had the issue for some time you said.

 

Looks nasty. From the photos that you have attached I'm assuming that this hoof is a bit clubby to begin with and the crack is coming from the toes (or is it originating from an injury in the coronet band?) How deep is that toe crack?

 

I am not a professional trimmer, however as a general guide I would trim the hoof so the hoof wall is non-load bearing, to stop the stress on the hoof wall that is creating/agravating the crack, both in the toe and quarters, and trim every week or two to keep the stress off those cracks (I am a bit obsessive though) and ensure the hoof is balanced properly.

 

However this would depend on how deep that toe crack is. Do you have any experienced trimmers in your area?

 

If the crack in the toe is coming from an old injury to the coronet band it will always be there as it is a fault in the growth of the hoof wall (as I understand)

 

I'm sure Peter will have some advice, hoepfully I haven't got it completely wrong either. :)

 

 

Peter's website (www.hoofworksaustralia.com) it has some great learning resources on trimming and bare hoof care and is a great place to start.

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Wow, that really is amazing, I haven't seen a crack like that before, it actually looks like a cow's hoof! Margs advice sounds like a good starting point to me, I would be interested to hear what advice Peter gives for this.

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How did this originally occur? How lame? It looks like perhaps with the central lesion that the coronary band is defective - this is not a good thing since hoof horn tubules grow from this area. I think you need to seek the advise of an equine veterinarian in conjunction with a master therapeutic farrier....my initial thoughts are that some sort of resection of diseased area + casting or support/ straps across the defect + filling materials and I am sure there would now be products out there that may encourage growth?? and treatment of any white line disease or the like - but I sure dont like the fact that it looks like the coronary band is not ok.

Look forward to more discussion on this.

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Hi yeah her foot is a bit clubby. The crack started in the toe however has now gone through her band. Manage to grow it out mid trim however by the time she is trimed the crack has gone all the way again. This mare has not had a fair chance at anything. I am trying to find a natural answer as I would love to remove her shoes. She is not lame today and is moving fine without pain. I have a equine specialist coming out tomorrow but am assuming he will put shoes back on. Would love to have the shoes off. Ok so if anyone has anymore info will be very helpful.

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Hi from the sounds of it the time between trimming needs to be shortened, if the original crack grew out and then reoccurred the stresses on the toe were too great. Probably weekly trimming would be my suggestion. However this doesn't really help you does it.

 

So is she without shoes now?

 

If time is short try contacting Peter by phone (contact details are on his website) or you could also try contacting Andrew Bowe at http://www.barehoofcare.com for advice in moving forward in keeping her barefoot. Andrew has the following to support and stabilise the hoof crack, so it may be worthwhile discussing with your specialist.

brace_cutout_thm.jpg

Hoof Braces

For hoof cracks. Now laser cut, easy to shape, allows better access for infection control. Provides extra stability to the hoof wall to aid healing and correct regrowth.

 

Hoof Braces AU$8.00 but1.gif Details but2.gifbut1.gif Add to cart

 

I agree that you need to have an expert review the hoof. Rachel is right there is probably white line issues and probably Peters "bug" in there as well.

 

Best of luck

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Hi there, doesnt look great does it. I think that if you are serious about saving her and your not up to speed with treating these sorts of things i would send her to someone like Andrew Bowe, they have a rehab centre and im sure that they will be able to help. It sure looks extreeme, and im sure that shoes are not helping. Hi have been to some of andrews clinics and get his newsletters and if you see some of the cases that they save you will be astounded. Good luck.

Cheers

Jill.

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Ok so the specialist came out today and said that she is not clubby hooves and that the damage that has occurred is because of years of neglect which I have been able to track down where and when she was and what had happened to her. The hoof itself is in big trouble and i need to change her feed yet again and she needs regular trims every three to four weeks. This will let the hoof repair itsel from the inside as the arteries will be full of muck at the moment and there for the blood is not moving around as it should. He decided at this stage shoes are still needed. However if anyone has another answers I am still keen to hear them. As for being serious I am more then ever serious. I have been trying to do what was right for this mare. Please understand she has had a very hard life and I have been trying to fix all of her issues including her feet. My pal is to get her barefoot trimmed and as I said any advise that is going to make this happen would be great.

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Hi Tijrocky,

It is sad to hear horses going through such a hard time, good on you for trying to help her out. Did the specialist trim her today? Can you put some pics of her foot after the trim? I think regardless of weather you leave the shoe on or not, if the pressure still remains on that toe, the crack will stay. From the picture, the foot is very upright and the heels & toes are long so more regular trimming will certainly help keep that under control.

 

If you are not happy with your specialists advice and you have little knowledge about barefoot trimming and you want to help her this way, I would be finding the best barefoot trimmer I can find and gaining some knowledge yourself is going to help you to understand why they are doing what they are doing. Where are you situated? We might be able to help you locate someone.

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Hi I am really happy with the specialist I am using but we are both open to suggestions. He is very good at what he does and explains everything as he goes. He has put the shoe on backwards as this will take he pressure of the crack but will give her support for her heels as they have been taken back to far. He has alined everything again as she was out quite a bit. He has also trimmed her toe right so that she doesn't bump it on anything. Will attach pics for you to see. I'm in Rockhampton qld 4701

 

Isn't letting me attach pics at the moment will try again in the morning

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Wow, again. It would be very interesting to hear from Peter here! I can see that the pressure is off the toe but shoe would be still stopping the normal function of the foot, in relation to getting that blood flowing that your specialist was talking about, and healing as a result.

She is a lucky girl to have you on her side now!!! I to have a pony that is now suffering from the effects of neglect, that are only surfacing now 3 years after I have had him and your right we do the best we can in the circumstances. I would be seriously looking for the advice of someone like Peter, or Andrew, who are the leaders in Australia and the world in podiotherapy, you can contact personally, they could then put you onto someone in their area, rather than wait for feedback on the forum.

Good luck

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Thank you for putting these pictures up, I am interested to see how your horses foot rehabilitates. I don't have the experience to give you suggestions, so I am looking forward to hearing what Peter's advice is.

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OK, what I saw when I looked at the original pictures was a foot with significant flares - bell bottoms in fact. I also saw toe pillars in-conjuction with what looks like steep natural foot that will have given rise to that big centre crack, and of course a quarter crack.

 

I am concerned with the shoe supporting the heel of the foot as this will have the effect of lifting the heel and further rotating the pedal bone and indeed further increasing the steepness of the foot.

 

The heels are from all that I can see still too long, you farrier has shortened the toe, but this path leads to further destruction of the internal workings of the foot.

 

I am happy that he has taken off the toe but needs to continue to take it off the ground round to where the pillars are or else this will continue to put pressure on to open up the crack. The coronet injury looks to be as a result of the previous trimming and not from coronet down (I could be wrong but I don't think so) We often see these injuries after flares have been mishandled - very common as a quarter crack from side flare left unchecked, and these centre cracks are usually from pillars.

 

I have recently done a thoroughbred that has P3 rotation and sole * that also had a significant centre crack. I'll put up some pictures. It has taken a year to rehab her foot to the point she can walk and trot on it, but it was still just Peter's trim for dummies, with a forcing groove, and what seemed to be a frightening amount of wall removed, so that the hoof could as always grow from the top down and the back forwards.

 

Like Margot I agree that all the load bearing wall in the deformed areas need to be removed. By taking all the pressure points off the ground the hoof wall will generate in such a way as to replace itself correctly and not conform to uneven pressures that make it distort like peanut butter in a bag.

 

Yes your horse will be a bit tender as it learns to walk on it's soles but this will pass and your horse will then be able to grow a better hoof.

 

By the way I note that there were a couple of significant Laminitis events on her hooves - those big rings show when the laminar was severely inflamed as a result of something we did - sweet feed, or big grass, or antibiotic (something that upset her insides). So there are a couple at maybe 3months and 6 months (I'm not so good at the timeline stuff but improving).

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THe shoes under her heel is because she was very uneven and she has not alot of heel on that side so this help balance her. The shoe is on backwards so that there is no pressure on the to crack. Yes that bands in her feet were seen and yes she has a 5 month filly on the ground. Almost a week since she was seen and things are looking up. Will take another pic in a couple of days. The lump on the coronet band is becoming smaller as the coffin bone moves back into place and the crack appears to of stopped(fingers crossed). She has not been sore or tender on this foot it seems to cause her no pain.

 

The specialest said that there was alot of damage done before I purchased her. She was not fed what she needed she didn't get the exercise she needed and most of all she didn't get the love and care she needed.

 

Made it very hard to do much with her but now we have trust and respect and i am able to do pretty much anything with her. Making everyones life alot easier.

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dr Alison McIntosh is the best in your area for feet - She did used to go to Rocky but her base is near Oakey - Try Google or i have her email at work - contact me if you cant find her.I agree with whats been said so far but there is a lot more that can be done also - the fine tuning is important in this case - I do believe barefoot is the best option

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Ah I wondered where Dr McIntosh had moved to. She is very good with feet too.

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G'day Tijrocky

 

Well I may be a bit late because everyone else has been giving you the right sort of answers.

I Will just ad that shoeing frequently causes these cracks so it is not my preferred way to cure them.

If Alli Macintosh ever comes up your way I agree it would be great if you can get her to look at this horse.

You may be encouraged by checking my Picasa album of a horse with a very similar "steep" foot and a complete dorsal hoofwall crack... http://picasaweb.go...HoofCOMPARISONS#

This one was completely grown out in six months but I am sure that was because tha owner did not have quite enough faith in me and put "Holy Water" on the hoof after each visit!!!

But having it perfect in eight to twelve months is not an unrealistic expectation...

BTW apart from wounds, almost all hoof cracks are caused by incorrect hoof shape and cracks in this area come from allowing (or even encouraging, the development of "toe pillars" and this is still happening after the last shoeing...

 

And Margo is right, part of the cure must be to eliminate “The Bug” which will have invaded the crack.

 

I hope this helps…

 

Peter

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